Archive for the ‘Tips’ Category

Tips on How To Improve Toddler Behavior

Friday, October 21, 2016 @ 08:10 AM
posted by mrscaz

We all know that toddlers are infamous for tantrums and other behavior issues. To encourage listening and cooperation, follow these parenting tips.

Show your love

Make sure your displays of affection for your child outnumber any consequences or punishments. Hugs, kisses and good-natured roughhousing reassure your child of your love. Praise and attention also can motivate your toddler to follow the rules.

Prioritize rules

Rather than overloading your child with rules from the outset — which might frustrate him or her — prioritize those geared toward safety first and gradually add rules over time. Help your toddler follow the rules by childproofing your home and eliminating some temptations.

Prevent tantrums

It’s normal for a toddler to have temper tantrums. To reduce the frequency, duration or intensity of your child’s tantrums: boy-1637872_640

  • Know your child’s limits. Your child might misbehave because he or she doesn’t understand or can’t do what you’re asking.
  • Explain how to follow the rules. Instead of saying, “Stop hitting,” offer suggestions for how to make play go more smoothly, such as “Why don’t you two take turns?”
  • Take ‘no’ in stride. Don’t overreact when your toddler says no. Instead, calmly repeat your request. You might also try to distract your child or make a game out of good behavior. Your child will be more likely to do what you want if you make an activity fun.
  • Pick your battles. If you say no to everything, your child is likely to get frustrated. Look for times when it’s OK to say yes.
  • Offer choices, when possible. Encourage your child’s independence by letting him or her pick out a pair of pajamas or a bedtime story.
  • Avoid situations that might trigger frustration or tantrums. For example, don’t give your child toys that are too advanced for him or her. Avoid long outings in which your child has to sit still or can’t play — or bring along an activity. Also know that children are more likely to act out when they’re tired, hungry, sick or in an unfamiliar setting.
  • Stick to the schedule. Keep a daily routine so that your child will know what to expect.
  • Encourage communication. Remind your child to use words to express his or her feelings. If your child isn’t speaking yet, consider teaching him or her baby sign language to avoid frustration.

For more of these great tips visit MayoClinic.com

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com / ullftuser

Tips and info. in this blog are courtesy of MayoClinic.com

 

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10 Tips for a Healthy Fall

Monday, October 17, 2016 @ 08:10 AM
posted by mrscaz

“December 31 over a drink is too late to set goals and make promises,” says Justin Price, owner of The Biomechanics, a personal training and wellness coaching facility in San Diego, Calif. Fall is a great time to start a fitness program because “‘you’re going to create good habits for the holiday season and the upcoming winter months,” says Price.

Chris Freytag, a fitness instructor and fitness expert with Prevention magazine, agrees.

“With the change of seasons comes a renewed time to rethink and restart,” she says. “‘What’s so special about January?”

  1. Take advantage of the weather. Fall can be a treat for the senses: the crisp air, apple picking, pumpkin  forest-63275_640carving, a gorgeous canopy of fall foliage, and the crunch of leaves underfoot. These months are a great time to exercise outdoors and enjoy cooler temperatures. “Walking, hiking and cycling are all awesome in the fall,” says Todd Durkin, MS, fitness coach and owner of Fitness Quest 10 in San Diego, Calif. Discover park trails and take in some new scenery, whether you’re walking, biking, or in-line skating, he suggests. In places where snow falls early, try cross country skiing or snowshoeing. Or, if you live near the beach, get out and play volleyball, throw the Frisbee around, or play a vigorous game of fetch with your dog. “It’s a great time to do beach activities because it’s so much less crowded,” says Price. If you’re near a lake, try kayaking or canoeing, for an excellent whole-body workout and a great change of pace. And remember, it doesn’t have to seem like exercise to be a great workout.
  2. Think outside the box. Always wanted to learn to tap dance? Attempt to box? Master the jump rope? Ask any schoolchild: Fall is a great time to learn something new.Many classes at gyms and elsewhere get started in the fall, so look around and see if something intrigues you. And with the kids in school, parents have more time to check out those classes, Freytag says.
    Fall is the perfect time to gain new physical skills, Price says, because you burn fewer calories when you begin a new activity (thanks to the learning curve). If you learn something new now, by next summer, you’ll have mastered the skill — and you’ll burn more calories doing it, just in time for swimsuit season.
  3. Be an active TV watcher. Many people get geared up for fall premieres of their favorite television shows, says Freytag. “If you’re going to sit down and watch hours of TV, get moving,” she suggests. “Make a date with exercise and TV.”While you watch, you can walk or run in place, do standing lunges, do tricep dips off the couch, or lift weights. During commercials, do push-ups or sit-ups. In a one-hour show, you probably have close to 20 minutes worth of commercial interruption.
  4. Integrate exercise into your life. You already know the obvious suggestions: park farther away from your destination; take stairs instead of elevators; take a walk during your lunch break. Here are a few that are less obvious:If you’re spending the afternoon taking kids to soccer practice, instead of reading a book or visiting with another parent, “why not walk around the outside of the field while they practice?”, suggests Price. “Or (if you feel comfortable) warm up and cool down with the kids.”
    Or try “walking meetings,” like those Price and his colleagues at Biomechanics often hold. ‘”We go for a walk, we brainstorm, and we figure out who’s going to take what responsibilities,” says Price. “‘Things get achieved much more quickly,” he says, and everyone feels better for doing it.
    You can even get moving while you get motivated — for fitness or other life goals. ‘”Get some inspirational music or find a motivational talk and download it to your iPod,” suggests Durkin. Walk while you listen for 30 minutes.
  5. Rejuvenate yourself. Fall is the time to rejuvenate body, mind and spirit, says Durkin. Get a massage after your run. Learn to meditate. Take an art class. Treat yourself not just with exercise but other activities that promote wellness, he says, so you can feel good physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.
  6. beech-10758_960_7206. Remember the 30-day rule. “‘It takes about four weeks for the body to adapt to lifestyle changes,” says Price. That’s why people who give up on their fitness programs tend to do so within the first 30 days.So, when the alarm goes off in the morning and it’s darker and colder, don’t roll over and hit the snooze button.”Try to stick with a program for a month,” Price says. “After a month, behavior patterns will have adapted and it will be much easier to stick with it after that.”
  7. 7. Strive for the 3 Cs. Freytag calls commitment, convenience, and consistency “the three Cs”, and says having all three will lead to a successful fitness program.First, exercise takes commitment. When a client complains to Freytag about a lack of time, she responds: “Tell me something I haven’t heard before. We’re all busy; that’s just part of our lives.”You have to start planning exercise, just like you do everything else,” like meetings, dinners, and getting kids to lessons and practice, she says. “Put in on the calendar, because later always turns into never.”Convenience means choosing a gym that’s close by, or an activity you can do at home, or a time when you’re not likely to be interrupted.Finally, there’s consistency. “I’d rather see a brand-new client work out for 10 minutes a day rather than one hour every month,” Freytag says.
  8. Deal with darkness. The best way to enjoy fall is to exercise outdoors. But it is getting darker earlier, and staying dark later in the morning, so be smart and safe.”Just because it’s 6 p.m. (or a.m.) and dark doesn’t mean you can’t work out,” says Durkin. If walking or running outdoors, he says, “wear a reflective vest and carry a flashlight.”When cycling, affix a light to your helmet or bike.If possible, use trails or a local school track to avoid vehicle traffic. Try to work out at the same time every day, so drivers get used to seeing you.
  9.  Dress in layers. When exercising outside, layer your clothing. Before your body warms up, you may feel chilled, but once the blood gets pumping, you’ll feel overdressed.These days, there’s no lack of great weather gear. Freytag and Price recommend clothing with wicking, often called “DriFit.”‘ This fabric wicks moisture away from your skin so you’re not exercising with wet  forest-411491_640fabric hanging on you.Freytag suggests three layers: “The inner layer should be a moisture-wicking fabric, so it wicks away sweat and you’re not chilled. The second layer should be a warmth layer, and the third layer should be a protective layer (like a windbreaker or rain slicker, depending on the weather).” “And don’t forget the sunglasses,” she warns. UV protection is important year round. Fall sun can be blinding at certain times of the day.
  10. Find your motivation. “People are motivated by different things,” says Durkin. It’s important to first discover what your individual goals are, whether it’s losing weight, strengthening and toning, or preparing for a race or event, says Durkin.But goals aren’t enough to get you there; you have to be motivated by the day-to-day workouts, he says. So choose something you’ll enjoy doing and will be likely to keep up, whether it’s walking or hiking with a friend, working with a trainer, or taking part in a “boot camp” class.Creating a challenge for yourself will motivate you, as will encouragement and accountability, he adds. “You want to know when you’re doing a good job, and when you’re not,” says Durkin.Remember too, that anything worth having takes work.”Tell me something you can do three times a week for 10 minutes and be great at? It doesn’t exist,” he says. “If it was easy to be great, everybody would be great.”

This article is courtesy of www.webmd.com

The above images are as follows:
Image 1 is courtesy of Pixabay / LoggaWiggler
Image 2 is courtesy of Pixabay / Hans
Image 3 is courtesy of Pixabay / gewa

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Everyday Chores for Toddlers & Kids

Monday, September 12, 2016 @ 08:09 AM
posted by mrscaz

If your children aren’t pitching in, they should be! Not only does it help lighten your load, but it gives them a sense of pride and accomplishment. Here’s a list of chores for kids, by age.

Everyday Chores for Toddlers and Preschoolers:  

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  • Help make the bed, until they are able to do it and then make it on their own.
  • Pick up their room, keeping it tidy.
  • Take laundry to the hamper or laundry room.
  • Help feed pets.
  • Dusting their space and helping with dusting other spaces.

Everyday chores for children ages 5 to 10 years-old:

  • All of the above
  • Clear and set the table.
  • Help out in cooking and preparing food.
  • Helping with shopping and putting away groceries.
  • Gather dirty towels in bathrooms.
  • Dust living room.
  • Dust family room.
  • Dust dining room.
  • Dust bedrooms.
  • Dust family room.

Everyday Chores for Preteens Ages 10 to 12:

  • All of the above.
  • Vacuum living room.
  • Vacuum hallway.
  • Vacuum bedrooms.
  • Vacuum stairs.  cleaning-268126_640
  • Vacuum family room.
  • Vacuum dining room.
  • Put away misplaced items in the family room.
  • Wipe baseboards in the living room (all common rooms).
  • Feed the pet.
  • Walk the pet or clean litter.
  • Clean out the pet cage.
  • Wash the pet or pet’s things.
  • Fold and put away laundry.
  • Load dishwasher.
  • Empty the dishwasher and put away the dishes.
  • Straighten closets.
  • Straighten shoe racks.
  • Help washing the car, inside and out.

For more chore lists including “everyday Chores for Tweens and Teens Ages 12+” – click here

The list and information are courtesy of  successful-parenting.com

Images are courtesy of Pixabay.com (top image – Myriams-Fotos), (Bottom image – jarmoluk)

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15 (Insightful) Back To School Tips

Monday, August 1, 2016 @ 08:08 AM
posted by mrscaz

Today being August 1st…Back to School is just around the proverbial corner. I thought it would be the perfect time to share some tips that might make this transition easier on all of us.

  1. Set your kids’ sleep schedules back to “School Time” two weeks before the first day. pencil-935551_1280
  2. Reacquaint your kids with the calendar schedule they’ll use to manage their activities.
  3. Try apps like iHomework or MyHomeWork to help your kids organize assignments.
  4.   Refresh your rules about screen time for the school year. What’s allowed and when?
  5. Establish a set “Family Time,” whether it’s during dinner or before bed.
  6. Discuss what your kids can expect on the first day so they feel more prepared.
  7. Visit the school with your kids so they can get familiar with their new environments.
  8. Get the lists of school supplies, books and technology your kids will need.
  9. Include your kids in back-to-school shopping by letting them pick out their items.
  10. Use this printable checklist to establish a regular morning routine.
  11. If your kids bring their own lunch, pack their lunch boxes before going to bed.
  12. Create an inbox for kids to leave things that need your attention, like permission slips.
  13. Keep a small emergency allowance in your kids’ bags, just in case.
  14. Remove things like mobile devices from kids’ bedrooms to focus them on sleeping.
  15. Talk openly with your kids about their feelings about returning to school. Make sure to hit on these 5 Back-to-School Worries.

For more tips like these – click here!

Tips courtesy of care.com
Image courtesy of Pixabay.com – by: bykst

 

 

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Toddler Sleep Tips

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 @ 09:05 AM
posted by mrscaz

My kids aren’t toddlers anymore but I know very well how important a good night’s sleep is, not just for your child but for you as well. I hope these tips help all of you groggy Mom’s and Dad’s out there get a better night of sleep for your child and you…

1. Waking up bright and early: “A reasonable wake-up time for a child is anywhere from 5:30-7 a.m., but some children are up before that time wide awake or their wake up time is too early for mom and dad,” says Jenn Kelner, a Certified Child Sleep Consultant who runs a business called BabyZzz.

Solution: “Room darkening shades to block out morning light, white-noise machines to block out morning street noise, a timed light tips aor child alarm clock that changes color when it’s time to get up, and an earlier bedtime. It’s counter-intuitive, but the earlier a child goes to bed, the later they will sleep in.” Amen. I saw it with my own kids. Now sleep mom and dad!

2. Giving up the nap when they still need it: If your child misses a nap because of older siblings’ activities or for some other reason, it actually becomes HARDER for them to nap. Over time, this overtiredness has a cumulative effect, which may cause the child to refuse to nap altogether.

Solution: “Start an earlier bedtime to help make up that sleep deficit and make it easier to nap,” says Kelner. “Get the child outdoors in the morning for fresh air and exercise, very soothing routine before naptime, and leave the child for 60 minutes to give them the opportunity to fall asleep without stimulation. Once the nap has been re-established, bedtime can be moved a little later.”

3. Difficulties in falling asleep: “Many children have difficultly falling asleep on their own if they are used to being rocked to sleep, or if they have been falling asleep next to their parents,” Kelner says.

Solution: Make sure the bedtime routine gets the child nice and drowsy. Turn off all electronics 60 minutes before bedtime. Leave the room slowly if they need you. For instance: Day 1-3, sit by the child’s bed or crib until they fall asleep. Day 4-6, move the chair to the middle of the room. Day 7-9, move the chair to the doorway. Day 10-12, move the chair outside the doorway.

4. Getting up in the middle of the night: Waking during the night is normal, but it becomes a problem when the child cannot return to sleep unassisted, Kelner says. It’s especially hard if the child calls out for mom and dad and everyone is losing sleep.

Solution: “Have a consistent soothing routine in place to get the child nice and drowsy. Ensure the child is getting enough sleep, as over-tiredness leads to frequent night waking,” says Kelner. “Make sure the child is able to self-soothe, and implement some sleep training/coaching if necessary.”

5. Asking for mom and dad 15 times after “good night”: We all know that kid (or have that kid) who wants one more kiss, one more hug, one more snack, one more AGH! This is a classic tactic that delays bedtime, which makes the child overtired, which then makes it more difficult for the child to fall asleep the next night.

Solution: “During your soothing routine, set a kitchen timer for 15 minutes, and explain that once the timer goes off, it’s time to say a final goodnight,” says Kelner. “Ensure that before the timer goes off, you anticipate what that child may ask for — so get them a drink, take them to the bathroom, and give the child lots of hugs. If the child is still requesting extra attention, start some sleep rules with consequences, or simply ignore their requests.”

6. Inability to self-soothe: Some children have more trouble than others soothing themselves into sleep when they are upset and especially when they wake up in the middle of the night alone.

Solution: “Giving your child a special transitional object, such as a teddy bear or ‘lovie’ to snuggle and go to bed with during the bedtime routine can help them learn to use this object to help themselves get back to sleep when they wake in the middle of the night,” says Jennifer Metter of Jenni June Certified Sleep Consulting in Los Angeles.

7. You are co-sleeping without wanting to: This is me. My kids always end up in bed with us and neither my husband nor I can remember how they got there.

Solution: “Using an uneventful quick and silent return to the bed without payoff can help eliminate this behavior. Sleep consultants call this, ‘The silent return’. Consistency is key here,” says Metter. “It requires a bit of work and perfect consistency from parent for successful results, but uneventfully and silently returning your child to their bed the moment you notice they are out of it will help teach them to remain there until it is time to wake for the day. Children won’t continually do what doesn’t work for them.”

Good luck and Good night!

Image and information courtesy of thestir.cafemom.com

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Swimming & Water Safety for the Upcoming Months

Monday, April 25, 2016 @ 11:04 AM
posted by mrscaz

With Summer just about a month away and temperatures already spiking, I thought I’d address the safety issues for parents so we all hopefully have an incident-free Summer. Pools, water parks, hot tubs/spas, splash pads, and water playgrounds are great places to have fun, be active, or just relax. Having fun while you swim this summer means knowing how to stay healthy and safe while enjoying the water!

Swimming is one of the most popular sports activities in the United States. And just 2.5 hours of water-based (or other forms of) physical activity per week has health benefits, we each need to do our part to minimize the risk of illness and injury.

Make a Healthy Splash: Share the Fun, Not the Germs  healthyswimming_456px

Swimmers, parents of young swimmers, aquatics and beach staff, residential pool owners, and public health officials can minimize the risk of recreational water illnesses (RWIs).

Prevent Illness

RWIs can be caused by germs spread by swallowing, breathing in mists or aerosols of, or having contact with contaminated water in swimming pools, hot tubs/spas, water playgrounds, lakes, rivers, or oceans. RWIs can be a wide variety of infections, including gastrointestinal, skin, ear, respiratory, eye, neurologic, and wound infections.

Most outbreaks linked to the water we swim, relax, and play in are outbreaks of diarrhea. These outbreaks are caused by germs like Crypto (short for Cryptosporidium), Giardia, Shigella, norovirus, and E. coli O157:H7.

These germs—sometimes millions at a time—can spread when someone who is sick has diarrhea in the water. Other people can get sick if they swallow the germy water—even just a mouthful.

Pool chemicals, like chlorine or bromine, are added to the water to kill germs. But they don’t work right away. If used properly, they can kill most germs within a few minutes. However, some germs, like Crypto can live in properly treated pool water for several days.

The job of pool chemicals is to kill germs. But when pee, poop, sweat, and dirt rinse off our bodies and into the water, the chemicals break down these other things instead of killing germs. This uses up the chemicals’ power, which means there’s less to kill germs.

Remember, we share the water—and the germs in it—with everyone. To help protect yourself, your family, and your friends from germs, follow these easy and effective steps each time you get in the water:

Keep the pee, poop, sweat, and germs out of the water!

  • Stay out of the water if you have diarrhea.
  • Shower before you get in the water.
  • Don’t pee or poop in the water.
  • Don’t swallow the water.

Every hour—everyone out!

  • Take kids on bathroom breaks.
  • Check diapers, and change them in a bathroom or diaper-changing area—not poolside—to keep germs away from the pool.
  • Reapply sunscreen.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.

Check the free chlorine level and pH before getting into the water.

  • Pools: Proper free chlorine level (1–3 mg/L or parts per million [ppm]) and pH (7.2–7.8) levels maximize germ-killing power.
  • Hot tubs/spas: Proper disinfectant level (chlorine [2–4 parts per million or ppm] or bromine [4–6 ppm]) and pH (7.2–7.8) maximize germ-killing power.
  • Most superstores, hardware stores, and pool-supply stores sell pool test strips.

FREE Healthy and Safe Swimming Resources

Remember: Think Healthy. Swim Healthy. Be Healthy!

References

US Census Bureau. 2012 statistical abstract of the United States. Recreation and leisure activities: participation in selected sports activities 2009[152 KB]

Image and Information courtesy of www.cdc.gov/

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Five FUN Outdoor Activities For Toddlers & Kids

Thursday, April 21, 2016 @ 01:04 PM
posted by mrscaz

As you know Spring has Sprung and Summer is just around the corner, us Mom’s (and Dad’s) need to keep the little ones busy. Here’s some creative and fun ideas that promise to do just that!

faces made from stones

 

1. Stone Faces – Use this FREE printable to turn a collection of stones into funny stone faces.  These face part stones are quick and easy to make and once made you can get creative making all kinds of funny stone faces. Toddlers and Preschoolers will love making these silly faces on stones, you can place them by your walkway, in your garden or give as gifts. Click image for step by step instructions and printable.

 

chalkpaint1-600x4002. Make your own chalk paint for awesome outdoor fun! This is super easy to make, with very little ingredients. Your children and toddlers will have a blast expressing their creativity outdoors (or indoors if you’re brave). It’s also safe, nontoxic and the best part…it will wash off with a hose or the next rainy day! Click the image for step by step instructions.

 

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3. Make Enormous Bubbles - Oh my! Science does not get much cooler than this, you have to see the size of these bubbles!  You might enjoy this even more than the kids will. This is a very simple and fast mix, in no time at all you will be creating the most amazing bubbles. Click the image for instructions. 

 

 

1coverbug4. Alphabet Bug Spray - All you need for this fun project is a spray bottle and chalk! Draw on the sidewalk or driveway, a bug with a letter inside of it and well, it’s super easy and kids seem to love it and they forget they are learning. For game instructions click the image.

 

 

 

Summer fun chalk

5. Magic Sidewalk squirt paint - You don’t need to purchase much for this one either. The clear plastic squirt bottles are about $1 each. The kids will love this and beg for a refill when their bottles are finally emptied. What a fun way to spend some outdoor time! Click the image for full instructions.

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Ten Parent Hacks That We ALL Need!

Friday, April 15, 2016 @ 10:04 AM
posted by mrscaz

Who doesn’t need and want to make life just a little bit easier? I know I do, even the smallest of tasks can become daunting with the monotony of the day-to-day chores and hectic schedules. So…with that being said, let’s take a look!

1. Put a “safety spot” sticker on your car to ensure an older child doesn’t wander off
while you load or unload the car.

aaa

parkingpalmagnet.com

You can improvise your own with a large, round sticker, or purchase the Parking Pal magnet here.

2. If your kids are always using new cups, give them their own designated cups with magnets to stick to the fridge.

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adventuresinpinteresting2012.blogspot.com

Not only does this mean less dishwashing, but cups can be kept at kid-height instead of up-high cupboards.

3. Helichrysum is the essential oil you need for accident-prone kids.

ccccc

sarahtitus.com

It’s used by dentists to stop bleeding instantly. Read more about it here.

4. A plastic cup will keep little hands safe when handling sparklers on the Fourth of July.

dddd

love2dreamdoyou.blogspot.com

5.  A crib sheet will keep an outdoor baby from getting bitten up by mosquitoes.

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littlebabywatson.com

Sometimes you want to keep baby outside with you while working in the yard. A crib sheet provides shade and protection from bugs.

6. Use a glue gun to prevent shoes from slipping.

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Facebook: CentralCoastTeachingTots

7. Add Jell-O to your popsicles so they don’t melt into a drippy mess.

ggggg

forfood.rezimo.com

Get the recipe for this slow-melt popsicle recipe here.

8. Another use for your glue gun: Plug up those holes in your bath toys so they don’t get all moldy.

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welovebeingmoms.blogspot.com

9. The “You Shall Not Pass” sign provides a visual limit to how much toilet paper your child can take.

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amandathevirtuouswife.com

10. And finally… this solution will SAVE YOUR LIFE (and your beds) during the potty-training phase.

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Peggy Wang/BuzzFeed

A serious time and sleep saver during a challenging time.

Here’s a bonus hack …or harmless plug – Dapper Snappers…Did you know we made a BuzzFeed list? Click here!

List Courtesy of BuzzFeed. Images credited in captions.

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Ten Tips For Moms of Toddlers

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 @ 01:03 PM
posted by mrscaz

I’m going to go ahead and call this… “The Top Ten tips for moms of Toddlers. These are random, yet important tips from a variety of categories…but all toddler related and much needed. 

1. Do Not use flat paint on the walls in your home. Best choice would be a Satin finish. Satin is easily cleaned and can stand up to high traffic.

2. To avoid middle of the night diaper leaks, try a diaper one size up. It should absorb more and get you through to morning.

3. Going to a friends for dinner, worried you won’t hear your sleeping toddler or baby in the guest room? Download this app to your iphone: codegoo.com If your child or baby awakes, your phone will call a number you have chosen (mom’s cell).

4. Lower your standards for cleanliness and organization. This will save your sanity. When the kids are older you can regain your rule of order and cleanliness, until then, who are we kidding, our house will never be a showplace from the pages of Trendy Home magazine. Seriously.

5. Make your life easier and say no to ironing. Wrinkle releaser is great, place the clothes on a hanger, spray and pull, viola! Wrinkle free and smells great.

6. Don’t aim for perfection. Nobody’s perfect, what things seem like on the outside, are usually different on the inside. New parents who are trying to be perfect for society are more stressed. Just do your best, that’s all you need.

7.  Be consistent. Between the ages of two and three toddlers are learning how their behavior impacts the people around them. If your reaction to a situation keeps changing, it’s confusing.

8. Try to do all of your errands in one day. For example, try to do all errands on Monday and all doctor appointments on Tuesday. This will make your life easier and your week more enjoyable.

9. Give yourself a bedtime. You can’t survive on five hours of sleep. Eight hours is probably not realistic for a mom of young toddlers, but you need the most sleep you can get and setting a bedtime for yourself will help you get more rest.

10. Drink water and remember you are doing the best you can do! Water is ultimately very important for you as a mom. If you are dehydrated, you can have headaches, fatigue and lack of energy. Be your best, be hydrated and keep up the good work!

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Friday, December 5, 2014 @ 12:12 PM
posted by mrscaz

Dapper Snappers are important accessories in your collection. Moms have to have them! Not only do they prevent droopy pants, they add a unique sense of fashion to the wardrobe and make an outfit more interesting. SAVE MONEY with the Dapper Snapper accessories by having the ability to adjust as your child grows through infancy and toddler years. Trending the seasons collection, patterns or solids, our family has been very creative with your toddlers in mind. By incorporating new designs, parents can celebrate a cause or a holiday, a favorite memory or a ignite a collective fashion statement. Every wardrobe needs at least one universal belt and one for personal trending.

Here are some of my personal favorites. Happy Holidays!

Like us on Facebook

cupcakes-chip

Butterflies-chip

 

Bmonkeys-chip

Autism-Chip(1)

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